Cannabis Concentrates: A Look at Live Resin and Rosin

Cannabis Concentrate Callouts:

A Brief Look at Live Resin, Rosin, and the potency of concentrates

As the cannabis industry continues to shatter sales records and reach new heights, consumers are always searching for the next big thing. Recently, consumers have taken an interest in cannabis concentrates. Some forms of these concentrates include shatter, wax, crumble, or simply ‘dabs.’ However, consumers are becoming conscious of the cannabis concentrates that are rosin as well as live resin. So what exactly are these cannabis concentrates, and how do they differ from what is already available on the market today?

What is Rosin?

The term Rosin refers to a distinct extraction process that applies a combination of heat along with pressure to instantly force the substance or resin out of the bud of cannabis. Furthermore, the term rosin originated as a method of making a product used to create friction with bows used for musical instruments such as cellos and violas. With cannabis, this extraction method is amazingly versatile in that it can either be utilized with dry cannabis flowers or to clean up hash and kief into a hash oil. The result is often translucent, thick and can even appear similar to the cannabis concentrate shatter. If performed correctly, rosin can be implicative of the flavor, yield, and potency of other extraction products that utilize solvents.

Live Resin

Live resin is a form of Cannabis Concentrates that are prepared utilizing a technique that uses recently gathered cannabis and freezes it to extremely cool temperatures before and during the extraction process. Considering Cannabis Concentrates, Live resin is fairly new to the concentrate game. Its origins are often noted at some point between 2011 to 2013 with a handful of extractors as well as growers. 

The History of Live Resin

When discussing the history of live resin, its creation is often accredited to two individuals. Additionally, this was done by creating a specific form of BHO (or Butane Hash Oil) extractor that has the ability to maintain the uncommonly low temperatures needed to produce live resin cannabis concentrates. The genius of the process was utilizing chilled, even frozen cannabis plant matter for the cannabis concentrate. By using frozen cannabis, the trichomes would become more susceptible to be being extracted into a cannabis concentrate. In unison, the two originators of live resin were able to create methods able to extract cannabis concentrates laden with extremely high levels of terpenes and trichomes.

How to Properly Identify Live Resin

In today’s landscape of the cannabis market, most cannabis consumers can successfully identify concentrates such as wax, shatters, dabs, and others. Live Resin provides a slight difference from BHO extracts; one of these differences is the viscosity. Live Resin often appears to be runnier versus solidified shatter or thick-dripping dabs. Live Resin often appears in the same varying shades of gold and amber as most cannabis concentrates, but more stocky yet thin form. Moreover, due to the overwhelming terpene content found in Live Resin, the aroma will often be more intense versus other cannabis concentrates.

Why Consumers are Praising Rosin

The common cannabis consumer considers two primary values when making a cannabis-related purchase: 1) the level of organics possessed by the product, and 2) the overall potency of the product. With these insights in mind, it is evident why consumers are intrigued by concentrates such as rosin. This form of concentrate can be prepared in a solvent-less fashion. This means BHO does not have to be used to create rosin. The fewer chemicals associated with cannabis, the more likely consumers are to be drawn to it. At this rate, rosin may take over the hash market in a way the cannabis industry has not seen before.

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