The Bastard Down Under

The Bastard Down Under:

A stoner’s guide to understanding the Australia Bastard Cannabis strain

The origin of cannabis predates recorded history. In 2020, the cannabis industry is projected to gross more than $200 billion by the end of the decade. This is likely due to the variety of cannabis available to consumers. However, patients and consumers are not the only ones reaping the benefits of the newly-formed industry. Hemp cultivators and investors have taken a serious liking to the Australia Bastard Cannabis strain. What is the Australian Bastard Cannabis strain, and what has caused the huge spike in its popularity?

What is Australia Bastard Cannabis?

Australia Bastard Cannabis sometimes referred to as ‘ABC,’ is a strain of cannabis unlike any other. This strain of cannabis has also been referred to as ‘wild hemp.’ This is due to how the ABC cultivates (we’ll delve into that later) across Australia. Researchers have claimed that the Australian Bastard Cannabis strain has been around for a while, laying dormant waiting to be discovered. It has grown in infamy due to its mutated appearance in comparison to traditional strains of cannabis. Cultivators turn to the ABC strain because it is extremely durable and cost-effective compared to other traditional textiles. 

The History of Australia Bastard Cannabis

The history of the ABC strain is extensive but complex. Cannabis researchers suggested that the Australia Bastard Cannabis strain was introduced into the North Wales area by a man known as Sir Joseph Banks around the early 1800s. Furthermore, This ABC strain was introduced to England and surrounding countries as a throwaway drug due to its potent psychoactive effects. Meanwhile, in Wales and Australia, the strain was growing in popularity for its durability and versatility as an industrial crop.

Identifying the ABC Strain

Compared to traditional forms of cannabis, identifying Australian Bastard Cannabis can be a breeze. The leaves associated with ABC mirror traditional garden herbs and clovers. The strain also forms bush-like features during cultivation. This makes Australian Bastard Cannabis easier to spot than traditional Indicas and Sativas. Moreover, due to the vagueness surrounding the strain’s heritage, ABC gained the moniker of being a ‘bastard.’

How ABC Differs from Traditional Cannabis

Compared to traditional strains of cannabis, the leaf traits associated with the Australian Bastard strain is recessive. This means a plant must receive the Australia Bastard Cannabis leaf trait from both parents for the trait to present in the offspring. The leaf traits associated with the ABC strain are the easiest way to tell the difference between that and traditional Cannabis Indica and Cannabis Sativa strains. The Australia Bastard Cannabis strain produces leaves similar to that of wild clovers. There are currently no other known strains that produce leaves remotely similar to the Australia Bastard Cannabis strain.

The Australia Bastard Cannabis strain also possesses a complex terpene profile similar to traditional strains of cannabis. The ABC strain has been found to contain caryophyllene, limonene, pinene, myrcene, and many other popular terpenes. According to researchers, most forms of ABC contain more limonene than the other listed terpenes. The Australian Bastard Cannabis strain also possesses more industrial properties than typical cannabis strains. 

The Cultivation Cycle of the ABC Strain

When observing the Australia Bastard Cannabis strain’s growth cycle, it maintains a unique ability that most forms of traditional cannabis do not possess. The ABC strain has auto-flowering properties. This means that the Australian Bastard Cannabis strain can catalyze and maintain its own cultivation cycle from seedling to adult. This is another reason it has been referred to as ‘wild, mutated hemp.’ The Australia Bastard Cannabis strain can grow out of control if one simply allows it to do so.

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