Why Consumers Love High-Powered Cannabis

As cannabis cultivation continues to grow widespread and become more popular across the globe, tiers of cannabis have naturally formed. These tiers have been established and regulated by a few different factors, with cannabis consumers establishing the status quo. Some of these consumers will swear by their exotic, organic and boutique high-end strains with amazing genetics. Others will boast about how a particular Indica, Sativa, or hybrid that have utilized healthy growing substrates yielding buds with high THC levels. However, these types of consumer will not disagree with one another. High quality cannabis is just statistically better. Let’s find out why.

A High-Powered History on Good Cannabis

Contrary to popular belief, high-quality cannabis is a fairly recent concept. Most of the cannabis burned during the counterculture wave of the 1970s was that of ‘regular,’ a term meaning low-quality cannabis. Regular, sometimes called ‘reggie’ or ‘schwagg’ often has low levels of THC. This can range from 4% to 9% of THC per gram. Most of the anti-cannabis propaganda of the early 1900 was the outlawing of regular weed. High THC levels of cannabis were a direct result of cannabis cultivators giving at-home growing a shot. This crossbreeding of cannabis would eventually give birth to high levels of THC.

Moreover, by implementing new growing techniques and equipment, cannabis plants could be grown in optimal conditions. Equipment and mediums such as CMH and LED bulbs and healthy organic growing substrates provided cannabis plants for room for optimal growth. The indoor flower stimulation of cannabis cultivation has also been a factor in the recent high levels of THC. Growers have even implemented a VPD chart or ‘vapor pressure deceit’ chart. All of these advancements in cannabis cultivation has paved the way for some of the intense indica, Sativa, and hybrid strains we have grown to love today (pun intended.)

Understanding High-quality Cannabis?


High-quality cannabis is an umbrella term given to cannabis that possess high-end qualities. Although there are a multitude of traits that can make cannabis high quality, these qualities are often at the forefront of the discussion:

  • Possessing high THC levels
  • Strong genetics
  • Dense terpene profiles
  • Expert cannabis cultivation methods
  • high levels of potency

9 times out of 10, high-quality cannabis possess one or more of the aforementioned traits. As far as the average consumer is concerned, cannabis is high-quality if it has high THC levels and extreme potency. The levels of THC the average consumer expects from high-quality cannabis ranges from 17% to 20%. Amounts above 20% THC are often viewed as exotic and boutique strains.

Is Top-Shelf Cannabis Better?

What makes high-quality cannabis more appealing is its potency. Consumers are naturally trying to get the most bang for their buck. It is economically more sound to purchase cannabis with high levels of THC per bud than it is to obtain cannabis with lower levels of potency. Mathematically, the exotic cannabis will require a lesser amount of consumption to obtain a more potent cannabis experience versus low or mid-grade cannabis. Most consumers can attest that subpar cannabis often yields more headaches than highs. Socially, cannabis consumerism is a real factor in the consumption of high-quality cannabis. Similar to how Apple consumers frown upon users of other consumer electronics: If you are not paying the big bucks for the flashy buds and potent highs, then you are not doing enough. Most consumers simply feel that subpar cannabis is a waste of money and a waste of time. For all of these reasons, it makes more sense to indulge in high-quality cannabis.

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